YOUR BRAIN ATTACK

HELP, ADVICE AND INSPIRATION FOR
BRAIN ATTACK VICTIMS


Hosted By

Sherry L. Pierce
Author of "I'M OK"



     

 

 



 

        k.cwww.yourbrainattack.com


Physical Effects of a Brain Attack

Daily living and activities will be affected by a person affected by a stroke. Usually due to the weakness of one entire side of the body, they will experience poor coordination, lack of awareness or neglect of the entire side of the body. The Stroke will cause difficulty in the movement of planning a sequence of movements. It is important for the person to slow down, carefully plan their tasks. Specific ways to accomplish tasks should be discussed with an Occupational Therapist.

Swallowing and Eating:

Swallowing muscles will be weak or paralyzed following a stroke. In severe cases, a person can choke, even on saliva. Therefore, fluids must be delivered via plastic tube into a vein. In milder cases, a stroke suffer will have problems at times when swallowing but will manage to eat semi-solid foods. In most cases the muscles will strengthen up and allow easier swallowing function.

Dressing:

Weakness to one side of the body may cause difficulty planning the order to put clothes on. The method of holding the garment with one hand and the neglect of the affected side hampers the ability to dress. Eventually, with time the sufferer will adapt. Again, consult with an Occupational Therapist for techniques.

Showering:

A shower seat, handrails or hand shower are helpful to stroke sufferers. For the lack of strength along with the added balance issues it�s safer to have showering aids. (Watch the hot water adjustment, because of the lack of sensitivity in the affected side, a sufferer could accidentally burn themselves).

Domestic duties:

There are many useful items that make tasks such as cooking, washing and performing household chores easier. This newfound independence will help with self-esteem and self worth. Caregivers please support your victim�s independent needs. It only means they are on their road to recovery.

Leisure:

Please prompt a sufferer to engage in social activities and social contacts. If this is impractical, new hobbies should be encouraged. Encourage joining a support group or volunteer work.

Toileting:

Urinary retention is weak after a stroke, particularly in a confused or drowsy patient. Most patients recover full control. Until they do recover, frequent bladder emptying should be encouraged. Try a waterproof sheet at night for preventive reasons. A higher toilet seat and or handrails at the toilet may be needed to help the victim to and from the toilet.

Driving:

After a stroke your ability to drive may be impaired. A medical clearance is very important. Not only does this safeguard your driving ability it will safeguard your insurance policy.

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